HEPATITIS C Clinic

Highlands now offers a specialty clinic that includes physicians, pharmacists, and nurses trained to ensure patients get the right treatment, follow-up, and education about the disease. Call (606) 886-7664 for Hepatitis C screening and treatment information. Learn more about Hepatitis C below.

About Hep C

Transmission & Exposure

People can become infected with Hepatitis C if they:

Transmission & Exposure Details

People can become infected with Hepatitis C if they:
• Share needles or other equipment to inject drugs
• Needle stick injuries in health care settings
• Being born to a mother who has Hepatitis C

Less commonly, a person can also get Hepatitis C virus infection through:
• Sharing personal care items that may have come in contact with another person’s blood, such as razors or toothbrushes
• Having sexual contact with a person infected with the Hepatitis C virus

Can you get Hepatitis C by getting a tattoo or piercing?
• Transmission of Hepatitis C (and other infectious diseases) is possible when items are not properly disinfected during tattooing or piercing; such as in prisons, homes, or other informal settings.

(*Information provided by Center for Disease Control Guidelines)

What is Hepatitis C?

Hepatitis C is a contagious liver disease that can range from...

What is Hepatitis C? Details

Hepatitis C is a contagious liver disease that can range from a mild illness to a serious, lifelong illness that attacks the liver. If untreated Hepatitis C is a serious disease that can result in long-term health problems, including liver damage, liver failure, liver cancer, or even death.

(*Information provided by Center for Disease Control Guidelines)

Who is at risk for Hepatitis C?

Some people are at increased risk for Hepatitis C, including:

Who is at risk for Hepatitis C? Details

Some people are at increased risk for Hepatitis C, including:
• Current injection drug users
• Past injection drug users, including those who injected only one time or many years ago
• Recipients of donated blood, blood products, and organs (once a common means of transmission but now rare in the United States since blood screening became available in 1992)
• People who received a blood product for clotting problems made before 1987
• Hemodialysis patients or persons who spent many years on dialysis for kidney failure
• People who received body piercing or tattoos done with non-sterile instruments
• People with known exposures to the Hepatitis C virus, such as:
   o Health care workers injured by needle sticks
   o Recipients of blood or organs from a donor who tested positive for the Hepatitis C virus
   o HIV-infected people
   o Children born to mothers infected with the Hepatitis C virus

(*Information provided by Center for Disease Control Guidelines)

Symptoms

Approximately 70%–80% of people with Hepatitis C do not have any symptoms...

Symptoms Details

Approximately 70%–80% of people with Hepatitis C do not have any symptoms. Some people, however, can have mild to severe symptoms soon after being infected, including:
• Fever
• Fatigue
• Loss of appetite
• Nausea
• Vomiting
• Abdominal pain
• Dark urine
• Clay-colored bowel movements
• Joint pain
• Jaundice (yellow color in the skin or eyes)

Can a person spread Hepatitis C without having symptoms?
• Yes, even if a person with Hepatitis C has no symptoms, he or she can still spread the virus to others.

Is it possible to have Hepatitis C and not know it?
• Yes, many people who are infected with the Hepatitis C virus do not know they are infected because they do not look or feel sick.

(*Information provided by Center for Disease Control Guidelines)

Who should get tested?

Talk to your doctor about being tested for Hepatitis C if any of the following are true:

Who should get tested? Details

Talk to your doctor about being tested for Hepatitis C if any of the following are true:
• You were born from 1945 through 1965
• You are a current or former injection drug user, even if you injected only one time or many years ago
• You were treated for a blood clotting problem before 1987
• You received a blood transfusion or organ transplant before July 1992
• You are on long-term hemodialysis treatment
• You have abnormal liver tests or liver disease
• You work in health care or public safety and were exposed to blood through a needle stick or other sharp object injury
• You are infected with HIV

If you feel that you have been exposed, Highlands is able to provide testing and treatment with the Highlands Hep C Clinic. Call (606) 886-7664 for more information. All patient information if confidential.

Treatment

Can Hep C be treated? Yes, Highlands now offers a specialty clinic...

Treatment Details

Can acute Hepatitis C be treated?
• Yes, Highlands now offers a specialty clinic with physicians and nurses trained to ensure patients get the right treatment, follow-up, and education about the disease. Patients are able to call (606) 886-7664 for Hep C screening and treatment.

• In the past, patients with Hep C had a very low chance of curing their disease, and treatment was often painful. Now with Highlands Hep C Clinic, treatment is comfortable, and provided in an outpatient care setting by physicians and nurses who specialize in Hepatitis. With this new care plan, patients will be able to cure their Hepatitis C in a healthcare environment exclusive to their needs.

Vaccination

Is there a vaccine that can prevent Hepatitis C?

Vaccination Details

Is there a vaccine that can prevent Hepatitis C?
• No, currently there is no vaccine for Hep C. That is why it’s important that once a person with Hep C receives treatment and no longer has Hep C, they do not re-infect themselves again. Learn how to manage your disease and not re-infect or exposure yourself by calling the Highlands Hep C Clinic at (606) 886-7664.


(*Information provided by Center for Disease Control Guidelines)